Articles Tagged with public

Kill the conversation

The National Campaign for Courtesy is again delighted to be working with Road Safety Champion GEM Motoring Assist to produce a ‘Courtesy Code’ for users of mobile phones.

Peter Foot, Chairman of the Campaign for Courtesy, said, “When you are out and about in places such as theatres, restaurants, trains, buses, libraries, art galleries, and many more, it is important to respect others when using your mobile phone. It is easy enough to do if we follow a few simple rules, and not only shows good manners but also makes situations more comfortable and pleasant for our fellow citizens.”

The Mobile Courtesy Code

  • Keep your voice down. Shouting is not necessary.
  • Speak quietly in public places such as buses or trains.
  • Try to text, or e-mail your communication to avoid speech that may disturb others.
  • Never leave your mobile on a table or desk at a meeting, or restaurant, even when it is on ‘vibrate’.
  • When using the phone to play electronic games, switch the sound off.
  • Never hold a phone conversation when carrying out another task with others.

David Williams MBE, Chief Executive of GEM Motoring Assist, is also concerned about the illegal use of phones by drivers and said, “The temptation to use your mobile while driving can be greatly reduced if you turn it off and keep it out of reach.

“Although it is important to keep a mobile phone with you in the car in case of an emergency situation it is illegal and dangerous to use a hand-held mobile phone and it should only be used when you have stopped your car in a safe place,” added David.

It has been announced by the Government that fixed penalty notices for illegally using a hand-held phone by drivers will increase from £60 to £100. In addition drivers will also receive 3 penalty points on their licence.

Research has shown that motorists who us a mobile phone while driving are four times more likely to have a crash and reaction times are around 50% slower for drivers holding a phone conversation.

For a free copy of the leaflet or to watch the short video, click Kill the Conversation.

Courtesy works both ways at work and in business

It’s a common sight in doctors’ surgeries, banks and similar places to see signs saying that offensive language and aggression towards employees will not be tolerated and that anyone doing so will be required to leave.

Recently, I’ve also heard individuals complain about the way they have been treated by both public services and private companies.

Customers and employers need to be treated courteously: it works both ways.

How do we achieve this?

Sometimes employees who meet the public every day do become cynical. They can feel they are not being treated with courtesy or frustrated at having to answer the same questions again and again. But in many cases the customer is there because they need help. Just because other people have been annoying or discourteous must not make us judge everyone on first sight. Whatever job we’re doing, whatever level we’re at, it costs nothing to be courteous to customers.

In the same way, as customers we must not assume that any employee is going to be unhelpful. Even if we’ve had a bad experience with an organisation, we must treat the person we come to see courteously.

Everyone deserves to be greeted politely and to be  treated with courtesy. If we start in this way, very often our dealings will proceed smoothly.

But what if they don’t? What if an employee is surly and unhelpful? What if a customer is aggressive and even violent? Then it is right for an individual or organisation to take appropriate action, whether to complain or require a person causing offence to leave.

Institutional or habitual discourtesy causes headaches not only for businesses and organisations, but for employees and individuals too. On the other hand, courtesy embedded in our everyday lives encourages things to go more smoothly and is beneficial to both sides.

What’s more, courtesy is free and available to us all at any time.

Courtesy works both ways at work and in business

It’s a common sight in doctors’ surgeries, banks and similar places to see signs saying that offensive language and aggression towards employees will not be tolerated and that anyone doing so will be required to leave.

Recently, I’ve also heard individuals complain about the way they have been treated by both public services and private companies.

Customers and employers need to be treated courteously: it works both ways.

How do we achieve this?

Sometimes employees who meet the public every day do become cynical. They can feel they are not being treated with courtesy or frustrated at having to answer the same questions again and again. But in many cases the customer is there because they need help. Just because other people have been annoying or discourteous must not make us judge everyone on first sight. Whatever job we’re doing, whatever level we’re at, it costs nothing to be courteous to customers.

In the same way, as customers we must not assume that any employee is going to be unhelpful. Even if we’ve had a bad experience with an organisation, we must treat the person we come to see courteously.

Everyone deserves to be greeted politely and to be  treated with courtesy. If we start in this way, very often our dealings will proceed smoothly.

But what if they don’t? What if an employee is surly and unhelpful? What if a customer is aggressive and even violent? Then it is right for an individual or organisation to take appropriate action, whether to complain or require a person causing offence to leave.

Institutional or habitual discourtesy causes headaches not only for businesses and organisations, but for employees and individuals too. On the other hand, courtesy embedded in our everyday lives encourages things to go more smoothly and is beneficial to both sides.

What’s more, courtesy is free and available to us all at any time.

Courtesy works both ways at work and in business

It’s a common sight in doctors’ surgeries, banks and similar places to see signs saying that offensive language and aggression towards employees will not be tolerated and that anyone doing so will be required to leave.

Recently, I’ve also heard individuals complain about the way they have been treated by both public services and private companies.

Customers and employers need to be treated courteously: it works both ways.

How do we achieve this?

Sometimes employees who meet the public every day do become cynical. They can feel they are not being treated with courtesy or frustrated at having to answer the same questions again and again. But in many cases the customer is there because they need help. Just because other people have been annoying or discourteous must not make us judge everyone on first sight. Whatever job we’re doing, whatever level we’re at, it costs nothing to be courteous to customers.

In the same way, as customers we must not assume that any employee is going to be unhelpful. Even if we’ve had a bad experience with an organisation, we must treat the person we come to see courteously.

Everyone deserves to be greeted politely and to be  treated with courtesy. If we start in this way, very often our dealings will proceed smoothly.

But what if they don’t? What if an employee is surly and unhelpful? What if a customer is aggressive and even violent? Then it is right for an individual or organisation to take appropriate action, whether to complain or require a person causing offence to leave.

Institutional or habitual discourtesy causes headaches not only for businesses and organisations, but for employees and individuals too. On the other hand, courtesy embedded in our everyday lives encourages things to go more smoothly and is beneficial to both sides.

What’s more, courtesy is free and available to us all at any time.

The post Courtesy works both ways at work and in business appeared first on please and thanks.

Courtesy and mobile phones

We’re being asked to do lots of press add radio interviews on using mobile phones in public at the moment. Clearly, this is an issue that resonates with many people.

Mobile phones are incredibly useful and can offer a vital lifeline when we need it, but also have the ability to annoy other people if we use them without consideration.

Do you think about the impact on fellow travellers if you use your phone on a bus or train? Do you get annoyed by people talking into their phones loudly? Would you ask someone to reduce their volume if it annoyed you?

Please let us know what you think.

 

NHS gag controversy a reminder of the need for fairness for everyone at work

The media controversy over claims by health service manager Gary Walker that he was “gagged by the NHS from speaking out about his dismissal and his concerns over patient safety” (reported by the BBC) is a reminder that every employee of every organisation deserves fair treatment at work.

Whether someone works in a big corporation or a small business, in the private sector or in a public service, they deserve to be treated fairly.

Apart from the fact that anyone who works in an organisation where they feel afraid or bullied could suffer from health problems as a result of the pressure, the organisation itself will suffer by preventing its employees from working productively and by failing to maintain their motivation.

Forward-thinking organisations will value constructive comments and suggestions from employees committed to its aims and vision. This includes identifying problems. An organisation which recognises this and faces up to its weaknesses is more likely to prosper and perform well than one which ignores them. In these tough times, an open, honest approach is to be encouraged.

Fairness is important at work, not just for the good health of employees, but for organisations as well.

• Robert Zarywacz is courtesy consultant for the National Campaign for Courtesy and has developed the please and thanks courtesy toolkit for businesses and employers.