thank you

Partner link: Thailand’s New Snooker Star, Sunny Akani, Thanks Ronnie O’Sullivan

A Smiling Star Is Born

Last week saw the emergence of a new kid on the block, who took on the world’s best and gave a masterclass in the exquisite skills of snooker combined with the wonderful warmth of great sportsmanship. When the young Sunny Akani (22) dazzled the now 6 times UK Champion, Ronnie O’Sullivan, we saw a new star in the making. Regarded as one of the greatest snooker players of all time, 42 year old,  Ronnie O’Sullivan was given a master-class by the young Thai snooker star. Previously unheard of (to many) Sunny dazzled the audience with a stunning display of world-class snooker shots.  Commentators said it was breath-taking stuff.  And when he had some bad luck or played the rare poor shot, he smiled. 

 

Ronnie ‘the Rocket’ O’Sullivan

At 42 years old, the Rocket has been winning for quarter of a century and is considered by many to be the most naturally talented player in the history of the sport and has been described by many in the sport as a genius (with 5 world titles and now 6 UK Championships, 31 titles in total – second only to Stephen Hendry).  This quarter final proved to be an intense battle – which Ronnie said ‘Sunny should have won.’  A Star & a Friend-For-Life Was Born.

 

 

Watch some of the stunning shots or go straight to 11 minutes 27 seconds to see this amazing interview.

 

A Smiling Star

Thailand’s 22 year old Sunny Akani, dazzled the 5 times world champ, Ronnie O’Sullivan and when things went wrong for the young Thai – he smiled, repeatedly. O’Sullivan applauded Sunny afterwards and told Sunny that British audiences love players who play ‘with a smile on their face’.

 

Dual Press Interview

Such was the mutual respect and warmth of friendship between the two, that they did a dual interview. Sunny said Ronnie was his hero. He then thanked Ronnie for the game. Ronnie wore a beaming smile and looked at Sunny with warmth and great admiration and told the TV audience that  British audiences love Sunny already, because (not only is he brilliant) but he ‘plays with a smile on his face’. Audiences love that, said Ronnie.

 

Snooker Table

 

“Thank You For The Game”

When the young Thai thanked Ronnie for the game, Ronnie immediately thanked him for the game also.  Both competitors wore beaming smiles throughout this interview. They then bowed to each other with the prayer-like ‘Wai’ hand gesture & spoke Thai briefly to each other. Absolutely beautiful – watch this video to the end because, last week, a star was born. remember the name, Sunny Akani.

 

 

 

Just take two seconds to . . .

. . . say ‘thank you’.

It happens all the time. We’re busy. Our colleagues are busy. Our customers are busy. There’s a deadline to be met. We work beyond our contracted hours. We do it for our colleagues, for our customers, for the business or organisation, for the community. We lose all track of time to get it done.

And when we eventually click to send the report, post the goods or send off the delivery, that’s it: nothing.

No recognition, no acknowledgement, no thank you.

Someone recently told me that they had worked extremely hard, beyond the call of duty, to gather data for a project, only to hear other people thanked and their own contributions not acknowledged. They felt deflated.

It takes just a few seconds to email or text: thank you.

It takes just a few seconds to call and say: thank you.

It takes a few more seconds to pop your head into an office and say: thank you.

It takes a bit longer to call into another building and say: thank you.

Whether it’s a few seconds or a bit longer, your ‘thank you’ will mean the world to the person you thank.

And what’s more, they’ll work hard for you again when you need it.

It costs so little, yet means so much to everyone.

Read our recognition and acknowledgement polite prompt and checklist for ideas on how to thank those who work so hard for us.

Thank you.

• Robert Zarywacz is the co-founder of pleaseandthanks.co.uk and is courtesy consultant for the National Campaign for Courtesy. As well as focusing on courtesy in daily life, he believes wholeheartedly in the individual benefits and commercial value of courtesy in business and the workplace. Robert provides commercial copywriting, PR and social media services at z2z.com.

Just take two seconds to . . .

. . . say ‘thank you’.

It happens all the time. We’re busy. Our colleagues are busy. Our customers are busy. There’s a deadline to be met. We work beyond our contracted hours. We do it for our colleagues, for our customers, for the business or organisation, for the community. We lose all track of time to get it done.

And when we eventually click to send the report, post the goods or send off the delivery, that’s it: nothing.

No recognition, no acknowledgement, no thank you.

Someone recently told me that they had worked extremely hard, beyond the call of duty, to gather data for a project, only to hear other people thanked and their own contributions not acknowledged. They felt deflated.

It takes just a few seconds to email or text: thank you.

It takes just a few seconds to call and say: thank you.

It takes a few more seconds to pop your head into an office and say: thank you.

It takes a bit longer to call into another building and say: thank you.

Whether it’s a few seconds or a bit longer, your ‘thank you’ will mean the world to the person you thank.

And what’s more, they’ll work hard for you again when you need it.

It costs so little, yet means so much to everyone.

Read our recognition and acknowledgement polite prompt and checklist for ideas on how to thank those who work so hard for us.

Thank you.

• Robert Zarywacz is the co-founder of pleaseandthanks.co.uk and is courtesy consultant for the National Campaign for Courtesy. As well as focusing on courtesy in daily life, he believes wholeheartedly in the individual benefits and commercial value of courtesy in business and the workplace. Robert provides commercial copywriting, PR and social media services at z2z.com.

Just take two seconds to . . .

. . . say ‘thank you’.

It happens all the time. We’re busy. Our colleagues are busy. Our customers are busy. There’s a deadline to be met. We work beyond our contracted hours. We do it for our colleagues, for our customers, for the business or organisation, for the community. We lose all track of time to get it done.

And when we eventually click to send the report, post the goods or send off the delivery, that’s it: nothing.

No recognition, no acknowledgement, no thank you.

Someone recently told me that they had worked extremely hard, beyond the call of duty, to gather data for a project, only to hear other people thanked and their own contributions not acknowledged. They felt deflated.

It takes just a few seconds to email or text: thank you.

It takes just a few seconds to call and say: thank you.

It takes a few more seconds to pop your head into an office and say: thank you.

It takes a bit longer to call into another building and say: thank you.

Whether it’s a few seconds or a bit longer, your ‘thank you’ will mean the world to the person you thank.

And what’s more, they’ll work hard for you again when you need it.

It costs so little, yet means so much to everyone.

Read our recognition and acknowledgement polite prompt and checklist for ideas on how to thank those who work so hard for us.

Thank you.

• Robert Zarywacz is the co-founder of pleaseandthanks.co.uk and is courtesy consultant for the National Campaign for Courtesy. As well as focusing on courtesy in daily life, he believes wholeheartedly in the individual benefits and commercial value of courtesy in business and the workplace. Robert provides commercial copywriting, PR and social media services at z2z.com.

The post Just take two seconds to . . . appeared first on please and thanks.

Does connecting prevent loneliness?

One of the the first things I do in the morning is take our dogs for a walk. Usually I’ll meet two or three people, sometimes five or six, either dog owners or people on their way to work. We usually say ‘good morning’ to each other or more if we have time or know each other better.

I feel I am lucky because I live in a small town and tend to know a greater proportion of the population. The local community numbers something like 12,000 whereas the London borough where I was born had some 200,000 residents at the time. Small feels friendlier, but are people just the same anywhere?

Travelling on the London Underground recently, as I stood by the doors waiting for them to open, I saw a woman on the platform drop her glove as she approached the train. As the doors opened, I said she had dropped her glove and she said “thank you”. She was flustered as she didn’t want to miss the train so I picked up the glove and handed it to her and she boarded the train. “You’re a real gentleman,” she said. It was good to help someone.

I don’t know if I am more inclined to notice such things and help as a result of living in a small community, but I believe that acts like this are beneficial anywhere. Perhaps we can feel vulnerable in a city with millions of people around us, but we are all still individuals. Taking the time for small acts of kindness can make a world of difference to people.

Someone who lives on their own could find that you are the only person they talk to on that day when you hold a door open for them or offer them your seat. It connects them with the rest of the humanity when perhaps they have been isolated by their situation.

Perhaps I look a little idiotic when I smile and say hello to strangers, a thing we do a lot in the country when out walking with our dogs, but I think it is just as beneficial in a city. And if it makes people feel better and improves their wellbeing, even better.

Robert Zarywacz is courtesy consultant for the National Campaign for Courtesy. As well as focusing on courtesy in daily life, he believes in the importance of courtesy in business and the workplace and manages pleaseandthanks.co.uk

Delivering courtesy with the daily papers

Eastbourne members Chris and Tricia Sneath mentioned that they gave a paper delivery girl a tip with a card before Christmas.

They received the attached note back and were struck by the sheer courtesy involved.

Thank you note from paper girl, Cheryle

Thank you to Chris and Tricia and to Cheryle for allowing us to publish this.