courtesy

Skipton receives Top Town for Courtesy Trophy for 2016

The Mayor Skipton Mayor of Skipton, Councillor Martin Emmerson accepts the Top Town for Courtesy Trophy 2016 from John Stokes, Acting Chairman of the National Campaign for Courtesy

Celebrities and executive councillors of the National Campaign for Courtesy travelled from across the UK to present the 2016 Top Town for Courtesy Award to Skipton in North Yorkshire on Sunday 27 November.

Acting Chairman John Stokes, standing in for Chairman Peter Foot, presented the Salop Leisure ‘Top Town for Courtesy Trophy’ to the Mayor of Skipton, Councillor Martin Emmerson at the Rendezvous Hotel, Skipton.

The event, attended by Skipton residents and business owners, included presentations from the campaign as well as appearances by celebrity patron, health and fitness expert, best known as Britain’s ‘Green Goddess’, Diana Moran.

John Stokes, Acting Chairman for the National Campaign for Courtesy, said: “It gives me great pleasure on behalf of the National Campaign for Courtesy to present the Salop Leisure trophy to the people of Skipton as we name it Top Town for Courtesy in Great Britain in recognition of its commitment to promoting courtesy throughout the local community. Congratulations and thank you to everyone in Skipton.”

Rendezvous Hotel owner Malcolm Weaving, who nominated Skipton for the award, said: “I’m absolutely delighted that Skipton has won Top Town 2016. Rendezvous Hotel guests often tell me what a pleasure it is to visit Skipton. They are amazed by the ‘real Yorkshire welcome’ they receive from locals.

“I am always impressed by the general level of courtesy in the town and it was really good to hear that the judges who visited experienced it too. All Skipton businesses can get a ‘Courtesy Top Town’ window sticker, which can be collected at the tourist information centre in the town hall, to show they are part of the town’s success.”

Voted Sunday Times Best Place to Live in Britain 2014, Skipton is a friendly compact market town on the doorstep of the beautiful Yorkshire Dales. Offering a superb range of activities, clubs, societies and entertainment it is also a short train ride away from the nearby city of Leeds.

The Rendezvous Hotel is family-run 96-room hotel, home to owners Malcolm and Karen Weaving, set on the Leeds Liverpool Canal, one mile south of Skipton, the ‘Gateway to the Dales’. It also features the largest square ballroom (according to our dance customers) in a privately-owned hotel in northern England.

Robert Zarywacz, Vice Chairman of the National Campaign for Courtesy, said: “Each year we seek out a town from across the country that has demonstrated courtesy in action. This year Skipton impressed our judges on their visit, following in the footsteps of previous titleholders Ilfracombe, Shrewsbury and Epsom.

“While a good quality physical environment is important, most people want to live in a friendly community. Modern lifestyles can create a lot of stress and courtesy helps us all to treat each other with respect. The Top Town award recognises towns where the community has taken the extra step to encourage courtesy in all aspects of life.

“Residents in any area who believe their town deserves recognition for the courtesy of their community can look out the for the launch of our search for next year’s Top Town for Courtesy early in 2017 at campaignforcourtesy.org.uk”

Skipton is Top Town for courtesy in 2016

Skipton Top Town for Courtesy 2016

The National Campaign for Courtesy is delighted to announce that Skipton in North Yorkshire has been selected as its Top Town for Courtesy for 2016.

The award follows vetting of the town by the charity and will be presented at an official event in Skipton in November attended by officials and patrons of the campaign.

Malcolm Weaving, who runs the Rendezvous Hotel in the town, said putting Skipton forward for the award was easy because he had seen how politely both residents and people in the hospitality industry behaved.

“Skipton has such a multitude of attractions alongside the courtesy naturally shown to our visitors by the people and workers of Skipton – it was a no brainer! When I put Skipton forward, no other town had a chance. Let’s keep it up, residents and employees in Skipton, as I think we are on a roll.”

Robert Zarywacz, Vice Chairman of the National Campaign for Courtesy, said: “Each year we seek out a town from across the country that has demonstrated courtesy in action. This year Skipton impressed our judges on their visit and now follows in the footsteps of previous titleholders Ilfracombe, Shrewsbury and Epsom.

“While a good quality physical environment is important, most people want to live in a friendly community. Modern lifestyles can create a lot of stress and courtesy helps us all to treat each other with respect. The Top Town award recognises towns where the community has taken the extra step to encourage courtesy in all aspects of life.

“Congratulations to Skipton on a thoroughly deserved win.”

Launched in 1986, the National Campaign for Courtesy is a registered charity that is committed to good manners; respect for self and others; courtesy for all; and rejection of anti-social behaviour.

Campaign thanks Katherine for keeping lane clear of litter

Courtesy certificate presented for clearing up litter

The National Campaign for Courtesy has presented 15-year-old Katherine Ball of Barnstaple, Devon with a certificate recognising her dedication to keeping a local lane clear of litter.

Vice-Chairman of the National Campaign for Courtesy Robert Zarywacz read about Katherine’s efforts to keep Barbican Lane clear of litter in an article in the North Devon Journal. He was shocked by the news that several people had sworn at her and deliberately dropped litter, which was demoralising her.

Robert immediately passed the article to the charity’s executive council, who agreed unanimously that Katherine deserved to be recognised for her contribution to the community, especially as the campaign has launched its own national anti-litter drive supported by patron Joanna Lumley OBE.

Robert recently met Katherine in Barbican Lane to present her with her certificate and thank her for all her hard work.

“Litter is a blight on our towns and countryside, so we are delighted to recognise Katherine’s initiative and energy in looking after the environment and improving it for everyone,” said Robert.

“Katherine is a shining example of what citizens can achieve and a beacon for young and old alike.

“We hope this certificate will encourage Katherine to keep up her good work and reassure her that it is valued not just locally but across the country.”

Courtesy award for Coffee Republic in North Finchley

National Campaign for Courtesy award to Coffee Republic North Finchley

The National Campaign for Courtesy has awarded the manager and staff of Coffee Republic in North Finchley a certificate acknowledging their exceptional customer service and courtesy to others

Campaign for Courtesy’s Vanessa Bond presented the certificate to manager Raj Mathur recently. Raj has been manager at the café in High Road for the last eight years and has developed a lovely community spirit within the cafe. Every Friday there is a chance to experience Shiatsu Massage, Reflexology, Indian Head Massage or Healing. There are evenings with local musicians or a Mind, Body and Spirit exhibition. Groups offering English or conversational foreign languages meet there and even the local press used to meet there, giving local people a chance to chat to them about local issues.

Vanessa Bond said: “I was delighted to award Coffee Republic with this certificate. The staff have been seen outside assisting people in wheelchairs to make their way in and helping them to their tables and it’s also a popular venue for mother and baby groups to meet up. They provide absolutely first class customer service to everyone and really deserve this accolade.”

Campaign for Courtesy’s 30th anniversary AGM – Saturday 28 May 2016

Please join us in celebrating our 30 year anniversary at our Annual General Meeting on Saturday 28 May 2016 at the Brothers Room in the Lancaster Hall Hotel, 35 Craven Terrace, London W2 3EL (see direction map below). Starting at 11.30am.

National Campaign for Courtesy Annual General Meetings are friendly, interesting events, especially when our celebrity patrons attend.

You can hear about all our activities, including our Top Town programme and #pleaseMAY, and meet the people running the campaign.

We welcome everyone. Lunch and refreshments will be provided – please let us know you are coming to help with catering requirements – email 

We’ll also be celebrating our #pleaseMAY initiative to make May 2016 a month of courtesy.

Translink bus driver receives National Campaign for Courtesy Award

From a Translink press release:

Paul Doyle and PR Smith
(from left) Translink bus driver Paul Doyle accepts his certificate from the National Campaign for Courtesy’s PR Smith

Translink bus driver Paul Doyle has received a special award from the National Campaign for Courtesy in recognition of his exceptional example of kindness towards the end of last year.

Paul, a Metro driver based in Falls Road bus depot in West Belfast, hit media headlines worldwide at the end of 2015 for a simple act of generosity in which he presented a winter coat to someone in need.

While out driving during his shifts, Paul often noticed a young man outside and was concerned by his lack of suitable clothing in cold and often wet winter weather conditions. He decided to buy the man a warm coat and give it to him the next time his bus passed by.

Another passenger on board the bus at the time who witnessed Paul’s generosity, shared it on social media and the story went viral. It even inspired a local radio station to launch a #clothesforchristmas campaign which received thousands of donations for vulnerable people in need across Northern Ireland with Translink stations also becoming collection points for clothing.

Paul received a special certificate from PR Smith, National Campaign for Courtesy Non Executive Director, who said: “I came across Paul’s story while reading the ‘Metro’ newspaper on my daily commute through London – just as his act of kindness went viral.

“Paul is a true inspiration and I’m delighted to meet him and find out more about his story. It shows how even one simple act of generosity can be so powerful it touches the hearts of an entire nation and raises the profile of a serious societal issue. Kindness has a knock-on effect. Paul tells me that both he and other Belfast bus drivers have observed that car drivers are more patient since this story went viral.

“On behalf of the National Campaign for Courtesy, I would like to thank Paul and officially recognize his exceptional thoughtfulness.”

On receiving the Campaign for Courtesy award, Paul Doyle said: “It’s brilliant – I’m pleased I’ve made more people think about people in need out there. I’m blown away by the reaction – my passengers are still talking about it. I think it’s also strengthened the relationship between bus drivers and our customers. After all, we are an important part of community life, meeting dozens of different people every day – I think this small gesture has made more people warm towards us which is great.”

Paul was also recently presented with a Special Award from the Federation of Passenger Transport NI in recognition of his act of kindness.

A new look for the New Year

We are updating our web site for 2016 to make it easier to use and more accessible on mobile devices.

We hope you are enjoying the Christmas holidays and wish everyone a Happy and Courteous New Year for 2016.

Spreading gossip about a solicitors’ clients

Is it courteous for a professional firm to discuss intimate details of your personal or business affairs in front of strangers?

Business courtesy: keep your clients' business confidential
Recently I had to visit an established firm of solicitors to collect a document. As I sat in reception, you won’t believe the juicy details of people’s affairs I overheard.

To the right of me sat three women – apparently a member of the firm and two clients – discussing a divorce in very audible whispers. I could tell you about the affair mentioned, but I won’t.

Then, in the centre of reception, a member of staff stood with a client discussing what action to take to stop a relative cheating her out of thousands of pounds she had invested in a joint property investment by selling the house without her knowing.

Did they realise we could hear every detail of their personal business? I would not pay £210 per hour plus VAT for services from a firm who allowed my business to be relayed to anyone sitting in reception.

Business courtesy: keep your clients’ business confidential

Both sets of clients must have had a lot resting on how their cases progressed and I think both required discussions in private. This is not only business sense, but also courteous.

These days, we are often required to discuss confidential details of personal and business matters in an open, public space by banks, building societies, councils and other government organisations. Not only is this not courteous, it is not a secure environment, especially when we encounter daily attempts to steal data about out personal and business identities and affairs.

The cost of privacy

How much does it cost to discuss such matters in an office behind closed doors?

Well, with charges of £210 an hour and offices located in the centre of a large town in South East England, I believe the solicitors I visited could easily have discussed these clients’ affairs in private.

Business courtesy goes beyond a friendly greeting and shaking hands: it’s about treating clients’ business with the confidentiality and respect it deserves.

Anything else is just not professional.

• Robert Zarywacz is UK writer, PR and journalist | founder of pressme.co.uk | partner in Zarywacz | courtesy consultant at pleaseandthanks.co.uk and the National Campaign for Courtesy | Follow on Google+ Twitter and LinkedIn

Spreading gossip about a solicitors’ clients

Is it courteous for a professional firm to discuss intimate details of your personal or business affairs in front of strangers?

Business courtesy: keep your clients' business confidential
Recently I had to visit an established firm of solicitors to collect a document. As I sat in reception, you won’t believe the juicy details of people’s affairs I overheard.

To the right of me sat three women – apparently a member of the firm and two clients – discussing a divorce in very audible whispers. I could tell you about the affair mentioned, but I won’t.

Then, in the centre of reception, a member of staff stood with a client discussing what action to take to stop a relative cheating her out of thousands of pounds she had invested in a joint property investment by selling the house without her knowing.

Did they realise we could hear every detail of their personal business? I would not pay £210 per hour plus VAT for services from a firm who allowed my business to be relayed to anyone sitting in reception.

Business courtesy: keep your clients’ business confidential

Both sets of clients must have had a lot resting on how their cases progressed and I think both required discussions in private. This is not only business sense, but also courteous.

These days, we are often required to discuss confidential details of personal and business matters in an open, public space by banks, building societies, councils and other government organisations. Not only is this not courteous, it is not a secure environment, especially when we encounter daily attempts to steal data about out personal and business identities and affairs.

The cost of privacy

How much does it cost to discuss such matters in an office behind closed doors?

Well, with charges of £210 an hour and offices located in the centre of a large town in South East England, I believe the solicitors I visited could easily have discussed these clients’ affairs in private.

Business courtesy goes beyond a friendly greeting and shaking hands: it’s about treating clients’ business with the confidentiality and respect it deserves.

Anything else is just not professional.

• Robert Zarywacz is UK writer, PR and journalist | founder of pressme.co.uk | partner in Zarywacz | courtesy consultant at pleaseandthanks.co.uk and the National Campaign for Courtesy | Follow on Google+ Twitter and LinkedIn

The post Spreading gossip about a solicitors’ clients appeared first on please and thanks.

Spreading gossip about a solicitors’ clients

Is it courteous for a professional firm to discuss intimate details of your personal or business affairs in front of strangers?

Business courtesy: keep your clients' business confidential
Recently I had to visit an established firm of solicitors to collect a document. As I sat in reception, you won’t believe the juicy details of people’s affairs I overheard.

To the right of me sat three women – apparently a member of the firm and two clients – discussing a divorce in very audible whispers. I could tell you about the affair mentioned, but I won’t.

Then, in the centre of reception, a member of staff stood with a client discussing what action to take to stop a relative cheating her out of thousands of pounds she had invested in a joint property investment by selling the house without her knowing.

Did they realise we could hear every detail of their personal business? I would not pay £210 per hour plus VAT for services from a firm who allowed my business to be relayed to anyone sitting in reception.

Business courtesy: keep your clients’ business confidential

Both sets of clients must have had a lot resting on how their cases progressed and I think both required discussions in private. This is not only business sense, but also courteous.

These days, we are often required to discuss confidential details of personal and business matters in an open, public space by banks, building societies, councils and other government organisations. Not only is this not courteous, it is not a secure environment, especially when we encounter daily attempts to steal data about out personal and business identities and affairs.

The cost of privacy

How much does it cost to discuss such matters in an office behind closed doors?

Well, with charges of £210 an hour and offices located in the centre of a large town in South East England, I believe the solicitors I visited could easily have discussed these clients’ affairs in private.

Business courtesy goes beyond a friendly greeting and shaking hands: it’s about treating clients’ business with the confidentiality and respect it deserves.

Anything else is just not professional.

• Robert Zarywacz is UK writer, PR and journalist | founder of pressme.co.uk | partner in Zarywacz | courtesy consultant at pleaseandthanks.co.uk and the National Campaign for Courtesy | Follow on Google+ Twitter and LinkedIn